Traditional cuisine

According to the tradition of the land, Bodeguita Casablanca prepares stew. Two or three a day. Blessed scoops. Examples? Sailors’ noodles, tomato soup, beans with cuttlefish, chickpeas with cabbage, Andalusian tripe (callos), lentils, beans, Asturian beans with pig’s trotters, string bean and pumpkin stew, stewed potatoes…

Every midday, around two o’clock, a rice dish is prepared. Fish or shellfish paella, veal with artichokes, black with alioli (garlic mayonnaise), mixed meat, etc. And then there are specialities, of course. Whiskey omelette, pig’s cheeks in red wine, fried fish – they boast of it -, Marquis-style sirloin of veal, suckling lamb chops, lamb shank, young Argentine bull, small squid in garlic with mata broad beans, and of course, the seafood of the season.

And who likes this traditional cuisine? Well, a purely Sevillian public. A loyal clientele who know what they want on coming through the door. Who demand without shyness. “As soon as they enter they know we have seen them. A greeting. A simple wink. We serve them as we would like to be served,” explain Antonio and Tomás Casablanca. Tourists also come in, of course. They tend to bring a note with what they want to order. Specific recommendations from those who enjoy this culinary offering.

The customer is asked for a “compass”. Spend a minute with him. And he is not given the menu. This is the place of suggestions. Of trusting in the dishes of the day. “Otherwise, we would have a robot to take commands,” they say. http://bodeguitacasablanca.com/en/traditional-cuisine/ http://bodeguitacasablanca.com/en/traditional-cuisine/ http://bodeguitacasablanca.com/en/traditional-cuisine/And it sounds like a little song with the recommended tapas. Sevillian ways.